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Pope Francis Names Three New Auxiliary Bishops of Newark

WASHINGTON—Pope Francis has appointed Rev. Msgr. Gregory Studerus, Rt. Rev. Elias Lorenzo, O.S.B., and Rev. Michael Saporito as Auxiliary Bishops of Newark.

Monsignor Studerus is a priest of the Archdiocese of Newark and currently serves as Pastor of St. Joseph of the Palisades Church in West New York, NJ. Rt. Rev. Elias Lorenzo, O.S.B. is a monk of St. Mary’s Abbey in Morristown, NJ and serves as Abbot President of the American Cassinese Benedictine Congregation. Father Michael Saporito is a priest of the Archdiocese of Newark and currently serves as Pastor of St. Helen Parish in Westfield, NJ. The appointments were publicized today in Washington, D.C. by Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States.

Bishop-elect Studerus was born March 31, 1948 in West Orange, NJ. He holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Education (1970) from Montclair State College. He received his Master of Divinity from the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception in Huntington, NY and was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Newark on May 31, 1980.

Assignments after ordination include: Curate at St. Aloysius Parish (1980) where he founded and developed the Spanish community; Pastor at St. Bridget Parish (1990-1997); Pastor at Parish of Resurrection (including St. Michael, St. Bridget, St. Peter and St. Boniface) (1997-2005). Monsignor Studerus has served as a member of the Archdiocesan Presbyteral Council (1991-1994), as well as Dean of the Jersey City Downtown Deanery (1991-1998 and 2002-2005), and the Dean of the Hudson North Deanery (2013-2016), and Episcopal Vicar of Hudson County (2015). He was named a Chaplain to His Holiness by Pope Benedict XVI with the title of “Monsignor” in 2005. He has been serving as Pastor of St. Joseph of the Palisades Church in West New York, NJ since 2005.

Bishop-elect Lorenzo was born October 6, 1960, in Brooklyn, NY. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy (1982) from Don Bosco College Seminary in Newton, NJ. In 1983, Abbot Lorenzo entered Saint Mary’s Abbey, Benedictine Monastery, American Cassinese Congregation in Morristown, NJ. In 1985, he made his First Profession, and his Solemn Profession in 1988, both at St. Mary’s Abbey in Morristown, NJ. He was ordained a priest on June 24, 1989.

Abbot Lorenzo also holds a Master of Arts in Liturgical Theology from St. John’s University in Collegeville, MN; a Master of Art in Education in Counseling Psychology from Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, and a Licentiate in Canon Law from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. From 1983 to 2005, Abbot Lorenzo held different faculty, administrative and leadership positions at Delbarton School in Morristown, NJ. He was also Director of Liturgy at Saint Mary’s Abbey (1988-1998), Prior of Saint Mary’s Abbey (1995-2002), and Rector of Abbey Church (1995-2009).

Abbot Lorenzo’s service includes the Paterson Diocesan Liturgical Commission (1988-2000), Chairman of the Paterson Diocesan Liturgical Commission (1991-2000), President of Abbey Woods (senior health care/housing) (2001-2005), Liaison for Abbey Review Board regarding cases of sexual misconduct (2002), and Vicar for Religious in the Diocese of Metuchen (2005-2009). Additionally, his work has included: Prior of the Primatial Abbey of Sant’ Anselmo, Rome (2009-2016); Procurator General for American Benedictine monks and nuns (2009-2016); President of the International Benedictine Confederation (2011-2016); and Canonical Counsel for Praesidium, Inc. (2007-2009) where he currently serves on their advisory board. His work as a member of the advisory board for Operation Smile International (1999-2009) has taken him on numerous international medical missions. Abbot Lorenzo is a founding member of the International Commission for Benedictine Education (1999-present), President of the International Commission for Benedictine Education (2013-present), Abbot President of the American Cassinese Congregation of the Order of St. Benedict (2016-present), and a member of the Conference of Major Superiors of Men, as well as a member of the Union of Superior General (2016-present).

Father Saporito was born May 3, 1962. He holds a Bachelor of Accountancy from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (1984) and a Master of Divinity from the Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology, South Orange, NJ (1992). He was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Newark on May 30, 1992.

Father Saporito’s assignments after ordination include various parishes throughout the State of New Jersey: Parochial Vicar at St. Joseph Parish in West Orange (1992-1994), St. Peter the Apostle Parish in River Edge (1994-1999), Our Lady of the Visitation Parish in Paramus (1999-2001), and St. Elizabeth in Wyckoff (2001-2004). From 2004 to 2011, Father Saporito served as Pastor at St. Joseph in Maplewood, NJ, and since 2011, he has been serving as a pastor at St. Helen Parish in Westfield, NJ.   

The Archdiocese of Newark is comprised of 513 square miles in the state of New Jersey and has a total population of 2,965,397 of which 1,220,143 are Catholic. Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin, CSsR is the current archbishop of Newark.

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Keywords: Bishops appointment, Pope Francis, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, Bishop-elect Gregory Studerus, Bishop-elect Elias Lorenzo, O.S.B., Bishop-elect Michael Saporito, Archdiocese of Newark, Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

U.S. Bishops’ Pro-Life Chairman Reacts to Senate Rejection of Pro-Life Bills

WASHINGTON – Earlier today, the U.S. Senate failed to advance the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act (S. 3275) and the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act (S. 311). In the Senate, 60 votes are needed to overcome a filibuster and advance a bill to a vote on passage. The Pain-Capable bill would protect unborn children from late-term abortions. It failed to advance by a vote of 53 to 44. The Born-Alive bill would prohibit infanticide by ensuring that a child born alive following an abortion would receive the same degree of care to preserve her life and health as would be given to any other child born alive at the same gestational age. It failed to advance by a vote of 56 to 41.

Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City in Kansas, chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Pro-Life Activities, issued the following statement in response:

“Today, the United States Senate failed to advance two critical human rights reforms that most Americans strongly support. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act would ban abortions after 20 weeks post-fertilization when a child can certainly feel pain and has a reasonable chance of survival. And the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act helps ensure that Roe v. Wade’s license to kill unborn children does not extend to killing the newborn babies who survive abortion. It is appalling that even one senator, let alone more than 40, voted to continue the brutal dismemberment of nearly full-grown infants, and voted against protecting babies who survive abortion. Our nation is better than this, and the majority of Americans who support these bills must make their voices heard.”

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Keywords: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann, Committee on Pro-Life Activities, Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, Roe v. Wade, pro-life.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Statement from U.S. Bishops Chairman of International Justice and Peace Committee on Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan’s Pastoral Solidarity Visit to the Church in Cuba

WASHINGTON—Bishop David J. Malloy of Rockford and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on International Justice and Peace, issued the following statement:

“I would like to congratulate His Eminence Cardinal Timothy Dolan on his recently concluded pastoral solidarity visit to the Church in Cuba. His Eminence, who traveled to the island at the invitation of the Cuban bishops, celebrated Mass at the Shrine of Our Lady of Caridad del Cobre in Santiago--the spiritual heart of Cuba--as well as at the Cathedral of Havana, the Adolfo Rodriguez convalescent home in Camaguey, the Carmelite Convent in Havana, among others.

“The Cardinal reiterated longstanding Holy See and USCCB policy on Cuba: Mutually beneficial trade relations, tourism, and cultural exchange with the United States are key in transforming Cuba and bringing prosperity to the Cuban people.

“Recognizing the Church's role in the development of Cuban civil society, His Eminence visited the Dominican-founded University of Havana and the tomb of Fr. Felix Varela, the great 19th century Cuban priest-patriot. The Cardinal also visited the Latin American School of Medicine and Caritas Cuba.

“In addition to expressing solidarity with our brother bishops in Cuba and meeting with Apostolic Nuncio Giampiero Gloder, His Eminence met with President Miguel Diaz-Canel. The Church in Cuba and the United States believe in the transformative power of dialogue, especially regarding the promotion of life, dignity, integral human development, and prosperity. I echo the Cardinal's expressions of solidarity and urge Cuban and U.S. leaders to work for concord and collaboration between our countries.”

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Keywords: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Bishop David J. Malloy, Committee on International Justice and Peace, Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, Cuba.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Catholic Response to Outbreak of Coronavirus

WASHINGTON - Bishop David J. Malloy of Rockford and chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace; Sean Callahan, president of Catholic Relief Services; and Sr. Mary Haddad, RSM, president of the Catholic Health Association of the United States, issued a statement addressing the Catholic response to the outbreak of the coronavirus.

Their joint statement follows:

“As communities and public health officials respond to the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in China and closely monitor its presence and progression in other parts of the world, we join in solidarity and prayer for those impacted or working to treat those infected by the disease. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, Catholic Relief Services, and the Catholic Health Association of the United States hope that governments will work together in partnership to improve all nations’ capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to this virus.

“The Catholic Church in the United States stands in solidarity with those affected by the coronavirus and their families, health workers who are valiantly trying to diagnose and treat patients, and those under quarantine awaiting results of their screening for the virus. We offer our prayers for healing and support those organizations, both domestic and international, working to provide medical supplies and assistance to address this serious risk to public health.

“In early February, the Holy See sent 700,000 respiratory masks to China to help prevent the spread of the disease. Within the United States, Catholic healthcare providers are at the front line of providing treatment and care to those impacted by the virus.  

“We also commend the U.S. government for transporting more than 17 tons of donated medical supplies to China. This response to the novel coronavirus demonstrates the critical importance of the need to work together and to invest in crucial health care systems here and in other countries, thus preventing and responding to community-wide emergencies. We urge the U.S. Congress to support these efforts by protecting access to domestic health care safety net programs and by providing additional emergency international assistance to areas impacted by the virus.

“We also urge individuals to stay informed as information becomes available by going to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.”  

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Keywords: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Bishop David J. Malloy, Committee on International Justice and Peace, Sean Callahan, Catholic Relief Services, Sr. Mary Haddad, RSM, Catholic Health Association of the United States, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, coronavirus.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Statement from U.S. Bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace Committee on Nuclear Disarmament

WASHINGTON — The Committee on International Justice and Peace for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has released the following statement on nuclear disarmament.

During the recent visit of Pope Francis to Japan, the Holy Father took the opportunity to speak forcefully on the subject of nuclear weapons and the threat that they represent to the world. Speaking at Nagasaki, he emphasized the need for a wide and deep solidarity to bring about security in a world not reliant on atomic weaponry, stating, “A world of peace, free from nuclear weapons, is the aspiration of millions of men and women everywhere. To make this ideal a reality calls for involvement on the part of all: individuals, religious communities and civil society, countries that possess nuclear weapons and those that do not, the military and private sectors, and international organizations.” - Address of the Holy Father on Nuclear Weapons, Atomic Bomb Hypocenter Park (Nagasaki) Sunday, 24 November 2019.

Later that same day, Pope Francis spoke in Hiroshima, the other Japanese city to have known the horror of a nuclear explosion. Addressing the moral implications of nuclear weaponry he stated, “The use of atomic energy for purposes of war is immoral, just as the possessing of nuclear weapons is immoral …” - Address of the Holy Father, Meeting for Peace, Peace Memorial (Hiroshima) Sunday, 24 November 2019.

The words of Pope Francis serve as a clarion call and a profound reminder to all that the status quo of international relations, resting on the threat of mutual destruction, must be changed. As Bishops of the United States, we have made similar appeals in the past when we stated, “the moral task is to proceed with deep cuts and ultimately to abolish these weapons entirely.” - The Harvest of Justice is Sown in Peace (1993).  

So too, has the international community recognized the need to move away from the threat of mutual destruction and toward genuine and universal disarmament, as reflected in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Article VI of that Treaty, which dates back to 1968, states each party of that accord will work in good faith for the end of the nuclear arms race by seeking nuclear disarmament based in “…a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.”

Pope Francis has used his visit to Japan to remind the faithful and all actors, states or non-states, of the moral obligation to re-commit to the work of ridding the world of nuclear weapons and the threat that they pose. That obligation weighs on the consciences of all to find a means for complete and mutual disarmament based in a shared commitment and trust that needs to be fostered and deepened.

The Committee on International Justice and Peace is grateful to the Holy Father for this renewed effort to bring about a world of peace and justice that is not based upon fear or the threat of nuclear annihilation but justice and human solidarity. As such, we also call upon our own government to be part of and indeed renew its primary responsibility in that effort. The nations which have nuclear weapons must take the lead in mutual reduction of their weapons. The non-nuclear nations too must refrain from pursuing them if Article VI of the NPT is to be the effective instrument to bring about the elimination of all nuclear weapons.

“Come, Lord, for it is late, and where destruction has abounded, may hope also abound today that we can write and achieve a different future.” (Pope Francis, Hiroshima, November 24, 2019.)

Members of the Committee for International Justice and Peace:

 
Most Reverend David J. Malloy, Chairman
Bishop of Rockford

Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera
Bishop of Scranton

Most Reverend Timothy P. Broglio
Archbishop for the Military Services

Most Reverend Frank J. Dewane
Bishop of Venice

Most Reverend Michael Mulvey
Bishop of Corpus Christi

Most Reverend William F. Murphy
Bishop Emeritus of Rockville Centre

Most Reverend Alberto Rojas
Coadjutor Bishop of San Bernardino

Most Reverend Abdallah Elias Zaidan
Bishop of Maronite Eparchy of Our Lady of Lebanon

 

 

 
Bishop Consultants to the Committee for International Justice and Peace:

 
Most Reverend Paul S. Coakley
Archbishop of Oklahoma City
Most Reverend Frank J. Caggiano
Bishop of Bridgeport
 

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Keywords: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Pope Francis, Committee on International Justice and Peace, nuclear disarmament, Japan, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200